It is currently Thu Apr 19, 2018 5:59 am

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Forum rules


Please click here to view the forum rules



Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 36 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Thu Jan 11, 2018 4:53 pm 
356 Fan

Joined: Thu Jan 11, 2018 4:46 pm
Posts: 10
Hello, I am new to this forum and have never owned a Porsche before. I am highly considering a 1964 or 1965 356 as a semi-daily driver. I would be using this to and from work and running around to meetings in the Spring/Summer/Fall in Minnesota (in a suit). Anywhere from 5 to 40 miles per day. Most of it would be neighborhood/city streets and some highway use. I have been told this is a mistake as my first Porsche and maybe I should hold off and go with something newer (early 80's 911). While the argument makes sense, I would like some additional input. Thank you!


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Jan 11, 2018 5:06 pm 
356 Fan
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jun 19, 2011 9:47 am
Posts: 505
Location: Rochester, NY
Are you good with working on old cars, are you mechanically inclined, will being late or missing your meetings be important, does your suit need to stay clean and dry?

_________________
Bruce


'63 356B (S-Coupe)
'67 912 (Rally car)
'68 912 (Golden Green)
'70 911T (CDI, Marelli, & Zeniths)
'14 911-50th (GTS)
'62 Austin Mini (850 stock)
'67 MGB GT (Grampian Grey)
'80 Chevy C10 (Stepside)


Last edited by Bruce Smith on Thu Jan 11, 2018 5:10 pm, edited 2 times in total.

Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Jan 11, 2018 5:08 pm 
356 Fan
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 22, 2013 4:29 pm
Posts: 277
Location: Lafayette, NJ
Good one Bruce! That about sums it up.


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Jan 11, 2018 5:54 pm 
356 Fan
User avatar

Joined: Tue Mar 25, 2008 7:20 pm
Posts: 1232
Location: Metuchen, NJ
It depends on if the car's been properly restored, at least mechanically. Assuming it was, it next depends on what you expect from the car. If you're used to the comfort, reliability and amenities of a modern car you may not like it for daily use.

But remember, back when the car was new, it was expected to be comfortable and reliable enough for daily use. And it certainly can be today, if you don't mind that it will require more frequent maintenance than a modern car (if you can't maintain it yourself you may have a difficult time finding someone to service it), it will not have air conditioning (you might sweat through your suit, just like we all did back in the day), it will keep up with modern traffic but will also require more concentration being driven in a world where everyone just wants to get somewhere, fast. And as a daily driver you won't be able to use classic car insurance, meaning you will not likely be satisfied with what happens in the case of an accident, theft, vandalism--you won't get what the car's worth.

_________________
Emil Wojcik
'64C Euro coupe


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Jan 11, 2018 7:46 pm 
356 Fan

Joined: Sun Jan 31, 2010 6:50 pm
Posts: 1076
I beg to differ from Bruce's comments. I used a 356 as a daily driver from the early 1980s through the mid 1990s and was never late for work or stranded...could not say the same for an Audi I later used as a commuter. My car was always kept at the curb, as I did not have a garage, therefore it was exposed to the varied weather we have in the Metro New York area. ( I experienced temps as low as -2 deg.F to as high as 103deg.F) In extreme cold, I would bring the battery indoors after I returned home.
Yes, I did enjoy working on my 356 and still do, yet the real credit is due to the car's inherent ruggedness more than to anything I added. The car was driven every day and in every weather condition.
I did not like the less than wonderful windshield defrosting at low speeds but my heat was good otherwise. Of course, if you are used to air conditioning, you might not be thrilled on extremely hot days. The 356 is a very comfortable car and I still find this to be true when we go on long drives, such as to the East Coast Holidays, where we drive at modern highway speeds, hundreds of miles, hour after hour...try that with many other classics, especially ones with small four cylinder engines. My wife and I did drive some 750 miles one day enroute to North Carolina, so this would indicate some level of comfort and reliability.
With the growing rarity of our old cars and the current values, it probably is not a great idea to still use one as a daily driver though. As Emil mentions, theft and vandalism or even accident damage can really ruin your day. When they were new cars, owner maintainance was the norm, so if you aren't comfortable with regular greasing and oil changes, you should re-consider using the car as a driver. Wet weather driving and salt/ snow exposure can lead to rusting, unless the car is really sealed. Unfortunately, most modern road users don't give a hoot how rare and beautiful your 356 is and you may find yourself involved in fender benders or find parking damage when you return to the car. This is why we no longer use our wonderful 356 as a daily driver but save it for pleasure drives...even if some are over 1,000 miles!

_________________


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Jan 11, 2018 8:35 pm 
356 Fan
User avatar

Joined: Wed May 28, 2014 5:02 pm
Posts: 321
Location: Dallas, TX
I've owned 17 Porsche cars since August 1967. The first was a 1963 which I bought pre-owned and used it as my daily driver. I enjoyed it, but thought the heater was inadequate and since it didn't have any air conditioning it was hot in the summer (like almost everyone else) as air conditioning was rare. Before that I drove a 1956 Packard which was very quick at 10 seconds to 60, so the 12.5 seconds the 356 took was a step back. It was virtually bullet proof but I traded that in for a 1966 911 for the increased power and smoothness in 1968. I drove Porsche cars ever since and enjoyed the refinement as time went on. Like has been said above, 60s and 70 cars took much more maintenance than newer ones. The schedule is 1500-3000 mile tuning, oil changes, etc. My recommendation for you would be a 993 (1995-1998) a 0-60 in 5 second car, which comfortably drives 80 on the highway and has good air conditioning and very comfortable seats. Both cars hold their value but the 993 doesn't require the maintenance of the 356. That said, when it does prepare for expense. You can probably buy maintenance if you want to pay a monthly fee. If you want a cheap Porsche buy a 996 for under 30k and have the IMS bearing replaced immediately for $4K, or a 2009 997 for under 40k. If you want the most modern of car that does 60 in 4 seconds buy a 991.1 for 50K. I've had my 2012 991 since new and it has never had a failure, just oil changes once a year. That is the last of the naturally aspirated cars and will probably hold value well. It gets better mileage than any of my other Porsches (over 30 on the highway) and good trunk room. Any of these cars would be wonderful to drive every day. The older ones would probably required some maintenance to bring them back up to newish condition.

But a 993 is half the cost so that's what I would start with for a daily driver. Then buy a nice 356 to drive on weekends.

Enjoy,

Chuck

_________________
Current:
2012 Silver 991
1995 Midnight blue 993
1965 Red 356C

Past:
Fond memories of 14 others (including a '63 Normal and a 61 S90) :)


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Jan 11, 2018 8:42 pm 
356 Fan
User avatar

Joined: Sun Aug 24, 2014 8:00 pm
Posts: 313
Location: Richmond, VA
Tag: '64 C Coupe
So I have both of your case study vehicles, a 356C Coupe and an '84 911 Carrera. I had never planned to use the 356 as daily transportation, but as a fairly reliable driver to work, to a haircut after, to dinner, Cars & Coffee, etc. 2 or 3 days a week.

It has fulfilled that role rather nicely! The comments above are pretty on par. The car brakes fine, accelerates fine and keeps up with traffic on my mixed 20 mile commute on highways and neighborhood roads. It makes the journey to work more a little less ponderous and the drive home at night an absolute blast. I drive it very frequently from about the end of March through November in Virginia weather. My season is probably a bit longer than Minnesota's. I don't take it when it's so chilly the heater won't keep me warm but I just suffer in the summer. It's not that bad with the windows open and the vent window turned to blow air on you. If I wore a suit every day, I don't think I'd find it as comfortable. I work somewhere I can wear short sleeves in the summer.

Certain times of year you'll be driving in dark or near dark, so your electricals and lighting will need to be perfect. Occasionally your car will have some kind of issue and you'll be late to the office. But you can avoid embarrassment if you take a different car on an important meeting day.

If you drive in traffic, it will get old driving every day and my car at least likes to be moving for optimum cooling. Not to mention that you are lower than pretty much every other car, and you won't have the visibility you have in a new sedan. You can compensate with good driving, leaving more space between you and other cars, having good situational awareness, etc. If your car is valuable, you WILL worry about the other idiots on the road, most of whom just look at you as an old, slow car and will treat you like everyone else if not worse. Driving defensively will be the order of the day. It is a much more active driving experience than driving a newer car. This may tire you on a daily basis.

You will learn to park more thoughtfully to mitigate potential damage to the car when you arrive at work. Parking on the top deck, far away from everyone else. You'll get more exercise on the longer walk to your building so that's a plus. You will look back at the car on your way in and smile at it. You will look forward to leaving at night so you can see it again, waiting there like a puppy for you to throw the ball.

If I know it's going to rain, I take my 2002 VW Golf. I don't worry about getting caught in an unexpected squall in the 356. I turn the wipers on. Oh, make sure those work well too. Also your handbrake.

You will think about taking it on a date or to the movies. You will worry about leaving it there unattended. Pop the rotor off and bring it with you. That will help. You will worry that a thief with a flatbed or dolly will not be stopped. You'll be glad you have insurance.

Finding insurance will be difficult, but not impossible. I'm not aware of any collector company that will insure a daily driver. I worked with my regular insurance provider to insure the 911, so I could drive that every day if I wanted.

In Virginia, collector car registration and plates (and the associated benefits in fees, etc.) do not permit driving to work, limit your driving radius from your home (except for shows) among other things. Lots of people ignore this. I registered the car normally, which means it will need to be inspected just like any other car. Everything will need to work. Make sure your horn functions.

The '84 911 is a MUCH more comfortable car to drive on a daily basis and I have had many days and weeks of uninterrupted driving of the 911 every day. It's worth half as much as my 356, so I worry less. It's a heck of a lot faster. It has some moderate improvements in crash safety so I stomp on the car more and drive more offensively. It's galvanized so I drive it in the rain with less concern. The lights are brighter, the heater is better. Pretty much everything is better. I still look back at it when I walk away and smile when I see it again. It's fuel injected which actually has been more of a problem than the carbs, which I find easier to maintain and troubleshoot. But the 911 starts easier, every time. No priming the float bowls, etc. Which cuts down on some of the mystique and specialness compared to the 356 but you save a few minutes of time on a busy day.

In general, I'd stay away from a 356 as a daily driver unless you lived in a climate like southern california and had an utterly traffic-free commute to work.

Do what I did - get both cars and get to have fun deciding which old Porsche to take to work today. :)


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Jan 11, 2018 9:37 pm 
356 Fan

Joined: Thu Jan 11, 2018 4:46 pm
Posts: 10
Amazing, thanks for all the stories and opinions, I'm loving this site already! I'll read this later tonight. BTW, I am handy, but have never worked on cars. Never too late to start!


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Jan 11, 2018 11:19 pm 
356 Fan
User avatar

Joined: Sun Jun 19, 2011 9:47 am
Posts: 505
Location: Rochester, NY
Bruce Smith wrote:
Are you good with working on old cars, are you mechanically inclined, will being late or missing your meetings be important, does your suit need to stay clean and dry?


Also - if you answered 'maybe' to all of these and you're under 30, then absolutely do it.

_________________
Bruce


'63 356B (S-Coupe)
'67 912 (Rally car)
'68 912 (Golden Green)
'70 911T (CDI, Marelli, & Zeniths)
'14 911-50th (GTS)
'62 Austin Mini (850 stock)
'67 MGB GT (Grampian Grey)
'80 Chevy C10 (Stepside)


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Jan 11, 2018 11:30 pm 
356 Fan

Joined: Thu Jan 11, 2018 4:46 pm
Posts: 10
Great tips and thanks again. Luckily my commute is only 8 blocks and the majority of my meetings are traffic free so I don't need to worry about that. Sean has a good point to get both cars, but of course there is another person I need to clear the decision with! Ironically a car enthusiast I know is recommending I get that '84 Targa as the daily. If I had a choice, I would certainly purchase both. I have another car so no problem if the 356 does not start and there seems to be mixed feelings about the reliability of it. One of the reason I am looking at the older versions is I don't want modern amenities, I want crank windows, no phone, back to basics. Thank you all!


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Thu Jan 11, 2018 11:49 pm 
356 Fan

Joined: Wed Mar 26, 2008 10:43 am
Posts: 547
Well, 5500 miles in a trip from Texas to the mountains in Colorado to Canada for a 356 event and back with narry a blip of a problem. Except my buddy in his car decided to fill up with diesel before we got out of Texas (we were in 2 cars) got it out changed the oil and yeah, the fuel and kept on going. So reliable. The bigger issue is the other idiots on the road these days.

They ain't a Lexus.....

_________________
 Roy Smalley
Texas


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 12:23 am 
356 Fan
User avatar

Joined: Sun Aug 24, 2014 8:00 pm
Posts: 313
Location: Richmond, VA
Tag: '64 C Coupe
Scott Ramsay wrote:
Great tips and thanks again. Luckily my commute is only 8 blocks and the majority of my meetings are traffic free so I don't need to worry about that. Sean has a good point to get both cars, but of course there is another person I need to clear the decision with! Ironically a car enthusiast I know is recommending I get that '84 Targa as the daily. If I had a choice, I would certainly purchase both. I have another car so no problem if the 356 does not start and there seems to be mixed feelings about the reliability of it. One of the reason I am looking at the older versions is I don't want modern amenities, I want crank windows, no phone, back to basics. Thank you all!


8 blocks! That's not enough driving to even get the old aircooled girl up to operating temp. This is easy: Get the 356 for all driving around except to work, and ride one of these to the office in Spring, Summer, and Fall: https://www.vintageelectricbikes.com/


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 10:05 am 
356 Fan
User avatar

Joined: Fri Apr 16, 2010 11:07 am
Posts: 395
Location: Arvada, Co
Hi Scott,

We have both, a '58 A Cab and a '86 3.2 Carrera Cab. I have driven the 356 to work downtown many times and have had to do a repair or two on the way home. I keep a good tool kit. It was how a sorted the car. It is completely reliable now so, if you start with a sorted car it is a great driver. I did Daily the 3.2 for a few years a few years ago and it is completely up to the task! The 3.2 has better Motronic fuel injection and handles the ignition timing as well. There is a bit of maintenance for both cars. The 356 is easier to work on, the 3.2 is more powerful and does have power windows. An '87 gets you into a better transmission possibly. The 3.2 has rust protection, not so much for the 356. They are very different cars. I would say the 356 has more in common with a 993 than the G-body cars.

Either can and were used as DDs when they were new. They are both very small compared to anything new. They will garner a bit more attention.

Sounds like you won't be trying to keep up at 80mph on a crazy freeway for hours so, provided you start with a sorted car - or are ok sorting a 30 to 50 year old car along the way, buy the one that puts the biggest smile on your face!

Franny

_________________
 


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 10:16 am 
356 Fan
User avatar

Joined: Sat Apr 05, 2008 8:21 am
Posts: 2880
Location: Augusta,Michigan
Scott I daily drove my 356s from 1980, until about 2000, 21 miles combo in town/interstate to work. Only time I had a problem was when a generator pulley broke on my way to work one day. So a 356 car be reliably driven daily if in good shape. A "young" 20 YO 1980 911SC then became my Daily Driver .

_________________
1965 356C and 1965 C Outlaw


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 10:57 am 
356 Fan
User avatar

Joined: Wed Aug 27, 2008 10:54 am
Posts: 1895
Location: Alpine AZ, Green Valley AZ
Most of us who owned a 356 back in the days when they were made drove them as daily drivers. They weren't 50 years old back then. Granted, you could put a 356 into new condition and use it as a daily driver today, but it may not make much sense, considering the other cars that would suit the purpose better.

The one thing that I see that would be a non-starter for me is your 8 block commute. Driving that short a run twice per day would constitute a form of abuse to your 356. The engine would never get up to normal temperature.

Just my $.02,
Wes

_________________
Some days it just isn’t worth the hassle of chewing through the restraints......


Top
 Profile  
Reply with quote  
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 36 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next

All times are UTC - 5 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot]


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group