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 Post subject: Re: Factory Bondo
PostPosted: Wed Jan 17, 2018 7:39 am 
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https://www.corrosionpedia.com/an-intro ... ion/2/1403

i guess since no one ever drives in the wet, we don't have to worry about what lead, steel and water do to accelerate corrosion (you folks in the western US can ignore this discussion) Yes properly sealed, and never chipped surfaces don't rust, but this is reality. Please note that the Galvanic Series attached to the article does not have plastic on it, it is neutral. Lead and carbon steel are far apart on the series, and with impure water make a battery that promotes corrosion. Another plus for plastic! Look at the chart and try to decide if stainless hardware is always a good idea. Stainless and mild steel are not real close on the chart. And before you guys decide that carbon fiber is great on the new cars, look at where Graphite is on the series. That is the same place Carbon Fiber is...

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 Post subject: Re: Factory Bondo
PostPosted: Wed Jan 17, 2018 9:30 am 
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I've decided to take a new position in public, LEAD IS BAD - MAKES A POOR REPAIR - DO NOT USE! There, now I won't have to wait so long for the real craftsman to do the lead work on my cars.

Unfortunately I don't think this ploy will work with Ferrari GTO, and similar, owners so I will still be waiting.

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 Post subject: Re: Factory Bondo
PostPosted: Tue Feb 06, 2018 7:58 pm 
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JC, what is done to protect from lead gassing and other harmful products that my make the paint fail?

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 Post subject: Re: Factory Bondo
PostPosted: Wed Feb 07, 2018 2:15 pm 
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max handley wrote:
Here are some pics of a recent restoration. It's a 59 A cab. Not much lead used but beautifully applied. Your example looks too sloppy to be the factory standards I've witnessed and I've stripped a few .


The early stampings used during the pre-A period were very poor quality. In fact they were so poor, Reutter and Porsche had lots of back-and-forth discussion of these issues, and it's the reason that Sigla laminated glass was used for the rear window on coupes instead of Sekurit tempered glass on the 356A and later. The stampings weren't consistent enough, and laminated glass needed to be used so it could be ground to fit. One sees this lousing stamping everywhere on pre-A cars, especially the cabriolets. Mark Turczyn discusses this extensively in his series of articles in the Registry Magazine back in vols 14 through 19. Some parts of the internal dash structure on the early 4-digit cars were off by 1/2 centimeter or more.

Of course the craftsmen at Reutter were talented, but the stamped panels were poor, mostly because of the poor quality of the stamps themselves which wore out very quickly after many stamped parts had been made. Reutter craftsman compensated for this by banging the panels back into shape and sometimes using copious lead where needed. This is why 2 pre-A panels can have quite different shape, and why even later into A and B production panels were numbered, as they were massaged to fit. The most numbering of panels occurs earliest in 356 production, where just about all bodywork was custom fit, and very little was interchangeable from one car to the other.

As 356 production ramped up at Reutter, they were able to invest in better stamping dies for the parts, which reduced labor costs. Frank Jung's "356 by Reutter" book discusses this quite a bit. A fun read (in German).


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 Post subject: Re: Factory Bondo
PostPosted: Wed Feb 07, 2018 3:13 pm 
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James Davies wrote:
max handley wrote:
Here are some pics of a recent restoration. It's a 59 A cab. Not much lead used but beautifully applied. Your example looks too sloppy to be the factory standards I've witnessed and I've stripped a few .


The early stampings used during the pre-A period were very poor quality. In fact they were so poor, Reutter and Porsche had lots of back-and-forth discussion of these issues, and it's the reason that Sigla laminated glass was used for the rear window on coupes instead of Sekurit tempered glass on the 356A and later. The stampings weren't consistent enough, and laminated glass needed to be used so it could be ground to fit. One sees this lousing stamping everywhere on pre-A cars, especially the cabriolets. Mark Turczyn discusses this extensively in his series of articles in the Registry Magazine back in vols 14 through 19. Some parts of the internal dash structure on the early 4-digit cars were off by 1/2 centimeter or more.

Of course the craftsmen at Reutter were talented, but the stamped panels were poor, mostly because of the poor quality of the stamps themselves which wore out very quickly after many stamped parts had been made. Reutter craftsman compensated for this by banging the panels back into shape and sometimes using copious lead where needed. This is why 2 pre-A panels can have quite different shape, and why even later into A and B production panels were numbered, as they were massaged to fit. The most numbering of panels occurs earliest in 356 production, where just about all bodywork was custom fit, and very little was interchangeable from one car to the other.

As 356 production ramped up at Reutter, they were able to invest in better stamping dies for the parts, which reduced labor costs. Frank Jung's "356 by Reutter" book discusses this quite a bit. A fun read (in German).


I had a 53 a few years ago that someone had done some crazy ice racing flares on the rear, a friend had some nice fenders he had cut off a car years ago. I trimmed the car and then lined the fender up using the decklid opening, it was off by almost an inch. I made it work, but it wasn't as easy as I thought.


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